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Poster:hersheybar
Date:2012-05-30 22:24
Subject:book club june
Security:Public

Reminder:
This month's book is The Lathe of Heaven by Ursula Le Guin, and the meeting is on Tues 5th June.

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Poster:hersheybar
Date:2012-04-24 21:42
Subject:next meeting May 1
Security:Public

Reminder:

Our next meeting date is (Tues) May the 1st, and our book is Among Others by Jo Walton.
The venue is the house of Chris and Sheree.

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Poster:hersheybar
Date:2012-02-26 18:59
Subject:Book club March
Security:Public

Next meeting: Tuesday 20th March

Next book: The Marriage Plot by Jeffrey Eugenides

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Poster:puddlesofun
Date:2012-02-21 18:15
Subject:*cough* *sneeze*
Security:Public

So, I've decided not to cover you all with my germs, so I am staying home in bed. I hope that book club goes well.

Also: Does anyone have the digital version? And do the footnotes work?

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Poster:puddlesofun
Date:2012-01-23 23:36
Subject:Hedgehog indeed.
Security:Public

Guys, there is no way I am going to be anywhere near finished this book. I will come anyway, as it doesn't seem the sort of thing where spoilers are a huge problem. But if I'm running late, you don't have to wait for me to start discussing it.
See you there.

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Poster:puddlesofun
Date:2011-10-23 22:29
Subject:Bookclub!
Security:Public

This Tuesday! Season of Mists! Garden of Earthly Delights (I think)!

zat cool?

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Poster:boojumlol
Date:2011-09-13 12:04
Subject:
Security:Public

So... should we make another attempt to meet for Season of Mists? I'll try to be more organised this time.

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Poster:puddlesofun
Date:2011-02-17 22:00
Subject:Next Meeting: 22nd of March!
Security:Public

Here are some possible things to read:

The Windup Girl
Paolo Bacigalupi
361 pages

Anderson Lake is a Calorie Man, working undercover in Thailand, a rogue state where generippers reverse-engineer the food cartels' sterile crops and combine them with carefully hoarded genetic material from the Thai seedbank. Anderson lives in Bangkok, undercover, running a factory nominally involved in the manufacture of experimental windup springs that can compactly and efficiently store the energy pushed into them by GM elephants. He is the hub around which many stories spin: that of Hock Seng, a former wealthy Malay Chinese who has fled an ethnic purge and now runs Anderson's factory; that of Jaidee, the Tiger of Bangkok, a hard-fighting, uncorruptable shock-trooper in the Thai environment ministry; and Emiko, a "new person" manufactured in a Japanese vat to be a perfect servile helper, abandoned by her owner to the brothels of Thailand, where she is cruelly mistreated.

The Windup Girl is a story about colonialism, independence, mysticism and ethics, sex and loyalty, and the opposing forces of greed and empathy. Filled with complex and flawed characters who must struggle to overcome their failings, The Windup Girl has no easy or pat answers, but rather charges the reader to summon empathy for imperfect humans who fail as often as they succeed.

But The Windup Girl is also an exciting story about industrial espionage, civil war, and political struggle, filled with heart-thudding action sequences, sordid sex, and enough technical speculation for two lesser novels.

*
The Art of Racing in the Rain
Garth Stein
400 pages

“In Mongolia, when a dog dies, he is buried high in the hills so people cannot walk on his grave. The dog's master whispers into the dog's ear his wishes that the dog will return as a man in his next life. Then his tail is cut off and put beneath his head, and a piece of meat or fat is placed in his mouth to sustain his soul on its journey; before he is reincarnated, the dog's soul is freed to travel the land, to run across the high desert plains for as long as it would like.

I learned that from a program on the National Geographic channel, so I believe it is true. Not all dogs return as men, they say; only those who are ready.

I am ready.”

*
Among Others
Jo Walton
304 pages
Raised by a half-mad mother who dabbled in magic, Morwenna Phelps found refuge in two worlds. As a child growing up in Wales, she played among the spirits who made their homes in industrial ruins. But her mind found freedom and promise in the science fiction novels that were her closest companions. Then her mother tried to bend the spirits to dark ends, and Mori was forced to confront her in a magical battle that left her crippled--and her twin sister dead.

Fleeing to her father whom she barely knew, Mori was sent to boarding school in England–a place all but devoid of true magic. There, outcast and alone, she tempted fate by doing magic herself, in an attempt to find a circle of like-minded friends. But her magic also drew the attention of her mother, bringing about a reckoning that could no longer be put off…

More here.

*

The Little Sister
Raymond Chandler
256 pages.

It is a Phillip Marlowe book by Raymond Chandler! The Amazon page does not give much information on the book's plot, and I am afraid to look further, but I'm pretty sure we can guarantee it will be
a) Hard boiled
b) Noir
c) Well written.

The Secret River
Kate Grenville
352 pages

Grenville's Australian bestseller, which won the Orange Prize, is an eye-opening tale of the settlement of New South Wales by a population of exiled British criminals. Research into her own ancestry informs Grenville's work, the chronicle of fictional husband, father and petty thief William Thornhill and his path from poverty to prison, then freedom. Crime is a way of life for Thornhill growing up in the slums of London at the turn of the 19th century—until he's caught stealing lumber. Luckily for him, a life sentence in the penal colony of New South Wales saves him from the gallows. With his wife, Sal, and a growing flock of children, Thornhill journeys to the colony and a convict's life of servitude. Gradually working his way through the system, Thornhill becomes a free man with his own claim to the savage land. But as he transforms himself into a trader on the river, Thornhill realizes that the British are not the first to make New South Wales their home. A delicate coexistence with the native population dissolves into violence, and here Grenville earns her praise, presenting the settler–aboriginal conflict with equanimity and understanding. Grenville's story illuminates a lesser-known part of history—at least to American readers—with sharp prose and a vivid frontier family.

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Poster:boojumlol
Date:2011-01-17 17:04
Subject:
Security:Public

We're on for tomorrow at puddlesofun 's, right?

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Poster:puddlesofun
Date:2010-12-13 18:46
Subject:Eeep.
Security:Public

I know this is short notice guys, but I was wondering if anyone else would be willing to host book club tomorrow? My house has suddenly come down with fleas. I was hoping to bomb it tomorrow, but there isn't anyone who can take Fizgig in the meantime so we've had to put it off.

I would hate for anyone to be my guest and accidentally take some unwelcome visitors home with them :(

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Poster:boojumlol
Date:2010-12-05 01:03
Subject:
Security:Public
Mood: disappointed

The 14th is my mother's birthday. I feel terrible and unfilial not remembering it sooner. Anyway, I won't be able to come to the Christmas party after all. Sorry. :(

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Poster:puddlesofun
Date:2010-10-26 19:51
Subject:Choices for next month.
Security:Public

Oops, I forgot to reply to the previous post. But I have now!
Look:
http://community.livejournal.com/justonemorepage/52280.html

So we should probably try for a final decision for Friday, does that sound cool?

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Poster:lydiere
Date:2010-10-20 21:07
Subject:Book suggestions!
Security:Public

Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet by Jamie Ford (301 pages)
"Fifth-grade scholarship students and best friends Henry and Keiko are the only Asians in their Seattle elementary school in 1942. Henry is Chinese, Keiko is Japanese, and Pearl Harbor has made all Asians-even those who are American born-targets for abuse. Because Henry's nationalistic father has a deep-seated hatred for Japan, Henry keeps his friendship with and eventual love for Keiko a secret. When Keiko's family is sent to an internment camp in Idaho, Henry vows to wait for her. Forty years later, Henry comes upon an old hotel where the belongings of dozens of displaced Japanese families have turned up in the basement, and his love for Keiko is reborn. In his first novel, award-winning short-story writer Ford expertly nails the sweet innocence of first love, the cruelty of racism, the blindness of patriotism, the astonishing unknowns between parents and their children, and the sadness and satisfaction at the end of a life well lived. The result is a vivid picture of a confusing and critical time in American history.

Our Kind of Traitor by John le Carre (305 pages)
While on holiday in Antigua, former Oxford tutor Perry Makepiece and his lawyer girlfriend, Gail Perkins, meet Dmitri "Dima" Vladimirovich Krasnov, an avuncular Russian businessman who challenges Perry to a tennis match. Even though Perry wins, Dima takes a shine to the couple, and soon they're visiting with his extended family. At Dima's request, Perry conveys a message to MI6 in England that Dima wishes to defect, and on arriving home, Perry and Gail receive a summons from MI6 to a debriefing. Not only is Dima a Russian oligarch, he's also one of the world's biggest money launderers. Le Carré ratchets up the tension step-by-step until the sad, inevitable end. His most accessible work in years, this novel shows once again why his name is the one to which all others in the field are compared.

Italian Shoes by Henning Mankell (256 pages)
Why is former surgeon Fredrik Welin hiding on his grandparents’ island? Can anything break him loose from his self-imposed exile? These two questions guide this short, beautiful, and ultimately life-affirming novel, as first one woman and then another enter Fredrik’s island prison. It starts with Harriet, the girlfriend he abandoned more than 30 years before, who suddenly appears on the frozen bay clinging to a walker. Mankell’s Kurt Wallander readers will appreciate his use of the themes of decay and danger in modern Swedish society, here represented by the dying island communities and the algae-clogged Baltic Sea.

Brooklyn by Colm Toibin (272 pages)
Committed to a quiet life in little Enniscorthy, Ireland, the industrious young Eilis Lacey reluctantly finds herself swept up in an unplanned adventure to America, engineered by the family priest and her glamorous, "ready for life" sister, Rose. Eilis's determination to embrace the spirit of the journey despite her trepidation--especially on behalf of Rose, who has sacrificed her own chance of leaving--makes a bittersweet center for Brooklyn. Colm Tóibín's spare portrayal of this contemplative girl is achingly lovely, and every sentence rings with truth. Readers will find themselves swept across the Atlantic with Eilis to a boarding house in Brooklyn where she painstakingly adapts to a new life, reinventing herself and her surroundings in the letters she writes home. Just as she begins to settle in with the help of a new love, tragedy calls her home to Enniscorthy, and her separate lives suddenly and painfully merge into one. Tóibín's haunted heroine glows on the page, unforgettably and lovingly rendered, and her story reflects the lives of so many others exiled from home.

How to Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe: a Novel by Charles Yu (392 pages)
The eponymous lonely-guy narrator in Yu’s debut novel is a time-machine repairman working in the slightly damaged Minor Universe 31, where people can time-travel for recreational purposes—or, Charles muses, is it re-creational purposes, given our desire to rewrite history? Charles dwells in a small module with TAMMY, a cute but insecure operating system, and Ed the dog, who is good company even though he’s a “weird ontological entity” rather than a flesh-and-blood animal. Woebegone Charles has never gotten over the disappearance of his father, a thwarted time-travel pioneer. With Star Wars allusions, glimpses of a future world, and journeys to the past, as well as hilarious and poignant explanations of “chronodiegetics,” or the “theory of the nature and function of time within a narrative space,” Yu, winner of the National Book Foundation’s 5 under 35 Award, constructs a clever, fluently metaphorical tale. A funny, brain-teasing, and wise take on archetypal father-and-son issues, the mysteries of time and memory, emotional inertia, and one sweet but bumbling misfit’s attempts to escape a legacy of sadness and isolation.

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Poster:puddlesofun
Date:2010-08-17 20:58
Subject:Next time:
Security:Public

September 21st.

The Uses of Enchantment.
By Heidi Julavitz.

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Poster:boojumlol
Date:2010-05-18 18:59
Subject:Suggestions for June
Security:Public

1. Regeneration, by Pat Barker
In 1917, decorated British officer and poet Siegfried Sassoon wrote a declaration condemning the war. Instead of a court-martial, he was sent to a hospital for other "shell-shocked" officers where he was treated by Dr. William Rivers, noted anthropologist and psychiatrist. Author Barker turns these true occurrences into a compelling and brilliant antiwar novel. Sassoon's complete sanity disturbs Dr. Rivers to such a point that he questions his own role in "curing" his patients only to send them back to the slaughter of the war in France. World War I decimated an entire generation of European men, and the horrifying loss of life and the callousness of the government led to the obliteration of the Victorian ideal. This is an important and impressive novel about war, soldiers, and humanity.

2. Tinker, Tailor, Soldier,Spy by John le Carre
It is now beyond doubt that a mole, implanted decades ago by Moscow Centre, has burrowed his way into the highest echelons of British Intelligence. His treachery has already blown some of its most vital operations and its best networks. It is clear that the double agent is one of its own kind. But which one? George Smiley is assigned to identify him. And once identified, the traitor must be destroyed.

3. The Picture of Dorian Grey by Oscar Wilde
A lush, cautionary tale of a life of vileness and deception or a loving portrait of the aesthetic impulse run rampant? Why not both? After Basil Hallward paints a beautiful, young man's portrait, his subject's frivolous wish that the picture change and he remain the same comes true. Dorian Gray's picture grows aged and corrupt while he continues to appear fresh and innocent.


The three are also in my order if preferences, if that helps. Thanks, guys. Hope it's a good night.

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Poster:lydiere
Date:2010-03-09 21:33
Subject:Book for April!
Security:Public

We'll be meeting on April 13th on 7:30.

The book is 'The Given Day', by Dennis Lehane.

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Poster:lydiere
Date:2010-02-06 15:30
Subject:Book!
Security:Public

I tabulated votes:

Kafka On The Shore 8
Invisible Monsters 11
Dune 6
Into The Wild 7
And Another Thing 13

Which means, I guess, we're looking at reading Dune.

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Poster:puddlesofun
Date:2010-02-03 00:12
Subject:BOOKS.
Security:Public

And Another Thing, by Eoin Colfer.
The sixth book in the Hitchikers Guide trilogy.

Kafka on the Shore, by Haruki Murakami.
A book in which bad things happen to cats.

Invisible Monsters, by Chuck Pahlniuk.
In which bad things happen to pretty people.

Into the Wild, by Jon Krakauer.
In which bad things happen to an idealistic young man who might have been better off had he brought a map.

Dune, by Frank Herbert.
In which bad things happen on the planet Dune (probably).

Please put them in your order of preference.

(Stuff I am putting here in case I am stuck for ideas in the future: Nickel and Dimed, Lords of Light, the little stranger, rainbows end.)

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Poster:hersheybar
Date:2009-12-14 19:21
Subject:reminder: book club 15/12
Security:Public

December Book club is on the 15th (tomorrow), and the book is The People's Act of Love by James Meek.

(January book club is on the 19th and the book is Underworld by Don Delillo. Sorted.)

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Poster:puddlesofun
Date:2009-11-25 16:39
Subject:Recap:
Security:Public

December Book club is on the 15th, and the book is The People's Act of Love by James Meek. January book club is on the 19th and the book is Underworld by Don Delillo. Sorted.

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